New Zealand

  • The project is a large-scale restoration of native forest that will provide increased erosion protection, improve freshwater quality, and enhance terrestrial and aquatic biodiversity. Waingake has been identified as having high value natural heritage. The forest to be replanted adjoins an existing reserve of regional and national significance and will effectively double the size of this ecologically significant place. The Waingake Waterworks Bush, adjacent to the area to be replanted, has been protected by a QEII covenant since 1987 and is one of the few remaining coastal low-land forests in the North Island. Indigenous plants and animals benefit most from a mixture of old and new growth. One of the greatest ecological values of Waingake is that it has additional habitats and vegetation types to the Waterworks QEII bush. Enhancing indigenous vegetation in the headwaters of the Te Arai, Nuhaka and Mangapoike rivers will in turn provide protection for aquatic fish and invertebrates. Collectively, these two areas will provide a large ecological stepping stone and corridor for native animals to move across the landscape.
  • Reversion of plantation Radiata Pine forest to native podocarp, using an initial mānuka (Leptospermum scoparium) as a nurse crop. This will be done to provide restoration of native biodiversity, alongside animal and plant pest management. These plants will also increase the stability of land from erosion to secure the main potable water supply pipeline to Gisborne City.

  • A personalized tree certificate to say thanks for your donation. We’ll also send you updates on our Australian project, so you can track the impact your trees are having on the community and environment.
  • Primary species to be planted is native Manuka (leptospermum scoparium), which will act as a nursery crop for a number of native species including podocarp seedlings from the nearby Waterworks bush. Around the water supply line, powerlines, and other infrastructure, low-growing trees and shrubs such as wharariki (phormium cookianum), koromiko (hebe tairawhiti), māhoe (melicytus ramiflorus), makomako (aristotelia serrat) whauwhaupaku (pseudopanaz arboreus), and toitoi (cortaderia spp.). After mānuka caopy has established, enrichment planting of tall growing natives suitable to the area such as kahikatea (Dacrycarpus dacrydioides), mataī (Prumnopitys taxifolia), miro (Prumnopitys ferrugine), and tItoki (Alectryon excelsus), will take place. Exotic Willow and Poplar poles will be planted in some areas for erosion stability in high-risk areas until Manuka is established, and then gradually removed.

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Map of Deforestation in New Zealand

Map of Deforestation in New Zealand EXPLORE ON GFW

WHY PLANT TREES?

New Zealand Wildlife

RESTORE WILDLIFE HABITAT

Restoring these areas also means putting wildlife habitats back in tact and creating healthy ecosystems capable of being resilient to climate change, which is critical as these areas are considered to be biodiversity hotspots.

Zew Zealand Forest Loss

PROTECT NATIVE SPECIES

Reforestation efforts assist native vegetation in growing back, while also improving soil quality, preventing erosion, and controlling invasive species - which can be particularly aggressive after forest fires without intervention.

MORE PLACES WE PLANT:

Plant Trees in Indonesia
Plant Trees in Haiti
Plant Trees in Guatemala

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